MDog and I.

We Write no Fights of Dutch or French,
No courting of a handƒome Wench,
No Mon¥ers, Wonders in the Air,
No perƒons dying in deƒpair;
Nor any thing under the Sky,
But onely of my Dog and I.

Tune is, My Dog and I : Or, Bobbing Ione.

Ou that are of the merry Throng;
Give good attention to my Song,
Ile give you weighty reaƒons why,
'Tis made upon my Dog and I,

   My Dog and I, my Dog and I,
   'Tis made upon my Dog and I.

I of no dogged nature am,
But loving, gentle, kind and tame,
And have no bigger Family,
But only two, my [Dog] and I,
   My Dog, &c.

I liv'd at home, I liv'd at large,
A ƒingle life, and had no charge,
And if a Wench I chanced to ƒpy,
Thither went my Dog and I,
   My Dog, &c.

I lov'd a maid her name was Nell,
A bonny Laƒs, I lov'd her well,
If you'd needs know the reaƒon why,
Becauƒe ƒhe lov'd my Dog and I.
   my Dog, &c.

My Dog and I have got a trick,
It is to cure maids when they are ƒick,
When the'r ƒick and like to die,
Then thither goes my Dog and I.
   My Dog, &c.

But if the weather prove foul and wet,
My Dog he ƒhall not wet his feet;
But if the weather prove fair and dry,
Then a whi¤ing goes my Dog and I.
   My Dog and I, my Dog and I,
   Then a whi¤ing goes my Dog and I.

F any maiden troubled be,
With over-grown Virginity,
I quickly can two Pills apply,
Concealed by my Dog and I,
   My Dog and I, my Dog and I,
   Concealed by my Dog and I.

If the Green-ƒickneƒs have po¤e¥,
A dainty dapper Damƒels b°ea¥,
Ile cure her on't immediately,
With nothing but my Dog and I,
   My Dog, &c.

If Women are in a di¥reƒs,
By reaƒon of their Barrenneƒs,
I can a p°oper P°obe apply,
Be¥ known unto my Dog and I.
   My Dog, &c.

From fifteen until fifty I,
Can give a woman remedy,
But if they up to threeƒco°e flie,
Their's no game fo° my Dog and I,
   My Dog, &c.

When Mars commaded, we did go,
Unto the wars in fo°ty two,
We'l never fear in field to die,
But out we'l go, my Dog and I,
   My Dog, &c.

There was a time when Rebel rout,
did fear Prince Rupert and his Dog,
'tis dangerous when two heads comply
Eƒpecially my Dog and I,
   My Dog, &c.

We night and day do take no re¥,
If we can hear of any fea¥,
And where good fellows I eƒpy,
There go in my Dog and I.
   My Dog, &c.

My living lies in every Nook,
My Dog is Caterer and Cook,
Fo° he at every Game can flie,
No fellow to my Dog and I,
   My Dog, &c.

My Dog to play the Pimp is taught,
I fear 'tis many a gallants fault,
Near Hatton wall ƒuch who°es do lie,
Are fitter fo° my Dog than I,
   My Dog, &c.

Thus have we liv'd, thus have we lov'd,
And faithful to each other p°ov'd,
Whil¥ many thieves are hang'd on high,
No Law can touch my Dog and I,
   My Dog, &c.

If death do come as it may hap,
My grave ƒhall be under the Tap,
With folded arms there will we lie,
Cheek by Jowl my Dog and I,
   My Dog and I, my Dog and I,
   Cheek by Jowl my Dog and I.

F I N I S

 

  Printed for F.Coles,T.Vere,J.Wright, and J.Clarke.


 

The tune "Bobbing Joan, or Bobbing Joe" (Simpson B031) starts 
automatically if your browser plays midi files (see configuration hints). 

The tune was also a popular dance; see Bobbing Joe in the online version of 
John Playford's The Dancing Master from 1653 (external  new windows).

 

This page has been set with a modern reconstruction of late 17th-century typefaces.
To display these correctly, see the instructions on the main page, 
Restoration Print Culture.
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Textual Notes

The ballad "My Dog and I," according to Donald Wing, was printed in London in 1675.  It was set in four columns on a single sheet, with a decorative border between each pair of columns (see facsimile). The original is in the Bodleian Library at Oxford; see 4o Rawl. 566(108)  in the new Allegro Catalogue of Ballads (external new windows).

A reproduction is available on microfilm in Early English Books, 1641-17001765:19. Indexed as Wing M3168A and ESTC R214289.

A reprint by John White in Newcastle-upon-Tyne has been tentatively dated by the ESTC to 1750 (ESTC T41661 and T41662); it could date from as early as 1700. See Douce Ballads 3(67a) in the Allegro Catalogue of Ballads (external new windows).

 

  1999 Francis Steen, Department of English, University of California at Santa Barbara
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